I’m Back!

It’s crazy to think back and realize it’s been about two years since I’ve been fully invested into this site. Life has a way of just taking priority over something that’s a hobby and certainly does not pay anything. But that’s ok, because it’s given me time to get my life in order and re-prioritize things, including this blog.

I started this with a friend in 2010 and have been able to do some amazing things during that time. Now it’s time to get back to what the original core value of the site was, and that’s providing opinions and stats of the Cup Series. With all of that said, let me get caught up with some commentary about what has taken place this off season.

Driver Retirements

Every sport goes through a spell where there’s a changing of the guard. Outside of Carl Edwards’ surprise announcement, it was time for Tony Stewart to leave and no one cares about Brian Scott or Ryan Ellis hanging up their helmets. I always love to play the what if game, and Edwards will leave me guessing what else he could have done. I say good for him to make that decision to walk away now with his health, as long as he’s content with his career. Don’t let fans fool you, they’re selfish and would rather a driver run way too long than walk away with dignity.

While not officially retirements, Greg Biffle and Casey Mears have been left out in the cold this off season, and that’s a good thing. Biffle is a lot older than most realize and there’s nothing he can add to an organization that isn’t a top tier team. It’s like how Clint Bowyer struggled last year going to HScott Motorsports, he’s likely to rebound in a big way because he’s with a top team. Mears always confused me how he kept getting rides. Sure he has a fuel mileage win with Hendrick Motorsports, when they were winning everything, but beyond that he’s been below average. I also enjoyed how suddenly everyone was a Mears fan when he got dumped, but before then most probably thought he just stared in GEICO commercials and didn’t race.

New Series Sponsor

The Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series or MENCS does not have a great ring to it, but it might over time. I hate the abbreviation because I feel like it’s a men’s club or something, but Monster might kick some much needed life into the series. Sprint did a good job of at track activation, but Monster could take it a whole new level. That is if they don’t go bankrupt first, but hey they’re only paying about half of what Sprint did for only two years, so they don’t have much to lose. I think NASCAR realized that by positioning the series as the <insert sponsor> NASCAR Cup Series. Side note, I’ll be calling it the Cup Series wherever I can because I don’t want to get too attached like I did with Winston.

New Race Format

Has anyone ever mentioned that NASCAR fans don’t like change? Naturally, they will not like this, but what I’ve gotten through my head is after 26 years of being a fan, I’m too invested to walk away. That said, this new format has promise, but I will have to see it in action before getting sold 100% on it. The strategy that will play out to “win” a segment should be intriguing. Removing the term “chase” from the dialogue of NASCAR was a plus as well, it is now simply referred to as playoffs.

Something that was added and not popularized during the press conference is a team cannot add body panels onto their cars if in an accident. Which will basically means: if you crash, you’re done. No more patchwork to get a car out there to run 15 mph off the pace and drop debris. While it’s a noble cause for teams to try and repair their cars to earn points, since there’s very little attrition during races there’s no real reason for it. Years ago engine/parts failures were common, now engines are near bullet proof.

The biggest con from all of this is the constant comparison of racing to stick and ball sports, oh and the word “moments” being used in everyone’s responses when talking about the formats. My guess is that NASCAR suggested that and we’ll see the new marketing campaign for this based around “moments.” Shoot me now.

Teams Folding/Merging

The charter system was a step in the right direction to make NASCAR ownership more cut and dry. Instead it seems to have hindered smaller teams even more, since if they’re not a charter they receive less money. And even having a charter wasn’t the cure all for teams as teams downsized or folded regardless of having a charter. The benefit is someone like Tommy Baldwin can walk away from ownership with something rather than getting taken to the cleaners. But the endgame shouldn’t be about the cash out, it should be about keeping these teams a float. When you have a system where Go FAS Racing decides it’s better long term to lease their charter to the Wood Brothers, then lease a charter from Richard Petty Motorsports in the meantime, something is broken.