The Double Standard Of Sports

Brad_Keselowski_Atlanta_Flip

NASCAR is no different than any other sports organizations when it comes to handing out punishments, yet exploiting it at the same time. This will happen again as Marcos Ambrose and Casey Mears were fined and put on probation. In time the footage that got them in trouble will be used for marketing purposes by NASCAR.

In the NFL, highlight reels are handed out of players hitting other players. Some of those hits cause concussions, which the NFL is trying to eliminate while using it to promote the hard hitting action each Sunday. The NHL plays hard open ice hits over and over that leave players bruised, battered, or worse.

This happens time after time in NASCAR.  There was outrage when Kevin Harvick confronted Greg Biffle after a 2002 Nationwide Series Bristol race. Now you can’t see a promo for Bristol without seeing that footage. Go back to 1979 when Donnie Allison, Bobby Allison, and Cale Yarborough’s fisticuffs at the end of the Daytona 500 have gone down NASCAR history lore.

I’m of the opinion that if NASCAR finds the need to fine drivers for “actions detrimental to stock car racing,” then NASCAR should not be allowed to exploit the footage. If they see an opportunity to use it in a promotion, then no disciplinary action should be taken, like when Carl Edwards and Brad Keselowski tangled in the “Boys Have At It” era.

I am not saying that fines and probation should not be used, because like Edwards and Keselowski proved, if left unchecked drivers will continue to push the  boundaries until it is painfully obvious NASCAR needs to step in.

What I am saying is NASCAR needs set the example, not condone actions while secretly hoping or pushing for conflict on the track. There also needs to be a clearer line of what is tolerated and what will not be tolerated. While Mears/Ambrose drew fines and penalties, Brad Keselowski’s brake checking and damaging Matt Kenseth, Dale Earnhardt, Jr., and others was acceptable.